Cloud Computing: Why Your Dental Practice Should Make the Switch

Cloud-based storage systems are becoming the norm for healthcare

Cloud computing for your dental practice

Cloud computing is changing the way healthcare organizations around the world store data.

These days, it seems like the cloud is everywhere. That’s because, quite literally, it is.

Already, the cloud has made sweeping changes across the medical field, as hospitals and practices make the change from paper-based and hardware storage systems to cloud-based systems. Now, it’s time for dentistry to do the same.

The cloud is a revolutionary advancement, and it can be a valuable tool for dentistry. When you’re “in the cloud,” it essentially means you’re using an Internet-based space to store all of your data. Patient records, X-rays, images – all of your electronic data can be stored in the cloud. By using the cloud, you get a data-storage solution that is flexible and responsive to your practice’s needs.

One of the best advantages of moving to the cloud is the ability to access the most up-to-date information anywhere, anytime. It’s always there to see no matter where you’re at or what device you’re using, as long as that device supports the cloud. It used to be hard to know whether you had the most updated version of your patient’s records, and outdated information can be harmful to both the patient and your practice. By using the cloud, all changes made to a patient’s file are updated automatically, and these changes can be seen by all users across multiple teams or offices, as long as they have authorization to do so. Anyone viewing a patient’s file through the cloud can rest assured that they’re looking at the most recent information on their patient.

Another advantage to the cloud is its flexibility. Making the switch is relatively simple, and storage space is practically unlimited. In addition, using the cloud is highly cost-effective. Most cloud service providers also provide IT support, which can save your dental practice a lot of money in the long run.

Many dentists new to the cloud worry about its reliability. With the cloud, the loss of data is nearly impossible. As far as security, the chance of someone accessing your data without permission or hacking into your cloud is low. Protection is offered through your cloud service provider, and it’s actually more secure than a traditional desktop program. You can be certain that only the people you want seeing your information will have access to it.

More than anything, the biggest reason for dentists to move to the cloud is simply because it’s the wave of the future. More and more health care organizations are implementing the cloud for their data storage, and nobody wants to be standing in the dust while their competition stays ahead of the times.

For more in-depth information on using the cloud for your dental practice, click here: Why You Need to Move Your Dental Practice to the Cloud.


For over 30 years, Havel’s has offered premium quality surgical scalpel blades, miniature blades and sutures to dentists, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To learn more about Havel’s selection of surgical blades and sutures, please click here: Havel’s Surgical Scalpel Blades, Miniature Blades and Sutures.


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Fine Needle Aspiration and Mesothelioma: A Better Method for Diagnosis

Italian researchers conclude it as their “preferred technique”

Fine needle aspiration biopsy might be better for diagnosing mesothelioma

Researchers have found that a fine needle aspiration biopsy might be a better way to diagnose mesothelioma because it is less painful for patients.

A group of Italian researchers from the University of Catania say they have found a better way to make tissue sampling for mesothelioma easier and less painful on patients.

The technique, called a thoracic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, relies on a specialized ultrasound technique designed specifically for chest imaging. Unlike a standard cutting-needle biopsy, a fine needle aspiration biopsy uses a finer needle to collect a small amount of tissue for examination. Researchers say that although samples collected from this technique are small, they are still suitable for evaluation, and the procedure itself is less traumatic for patients.

To learn more about the new research, click here: Fine Needle Biopsy: An Easier Way to Diagnose Mesothelioma?


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality radiology needles and biopsy needles for radiologists, surgeons, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of radiology and biopsy needles, please click here: Havel’s Radiology and Biopsy Needles.


 

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Spotlight: The Best Hospitals to Work For in Northeast America

Eight out of 10 of the best rely on Havel’s

Johns Hopkins Hospital is the best hospital to work for in northeast America

Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland leads the list of the top 10 best hospitals to work for in northeast America.

As healthcare continues to evolve, hospitals and medical centers across the country have evolved as well, adapting to the needs of 21st medical care. Recently, Healthcare Global released a top 10 list of the best hospitals to work for in northeast America. All of the hospitals represent facilities that are leading the way not only in employee satisfaction, but patient satisfaction too. They signify the best in strong credentials and a rich history of innovation, all while furthering the quality of healthcare in this country.

Topping the list was Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, who also ranked number one on U.S. News & World Report’s list of the best hospitals in the country for 2013-14. Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City came in second, followed by Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, which currently performs in the top five percent nationwide. Rounding out the top five was Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania and Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pennsylvania at number four and five, respectively.

From the list, eight out of 10 rely on Havel’s medical products, which include our superior quality procedure needles and surgical scalpel blades. Havel’s is proud to serve some of the leading hospitals and medical centers not only in the northeast United States, but across the country as well.

To read the full list of hospitals, click here: Top 10: Best Hospitals to Work For in the Northeast United States.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality ultrasound and procedure needles for anesthesia, pain control, radiology and biopsy, as well as sutures and surgical scalpel blades, for doctors, hospitals, veterinarians, dentists, dermatologists and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of procedure needles, sutures and surgical scalpel blades, please click here: Havel’s Procedure Needles, Sutures and Surgical Scalpel Blades.


 

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Study Confirms Safeness of Caudal Blocks for Pediatric Surgery

Complication rate fewer than two percent for the regional anesthesia procedure

Caudal blocks safe for pediatric surgery

A new report found that caudal blocks are safe and effective for infants and children undergoing surgery.

A new report published in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia shows that caudal nerve blocks, a common regional anesthesia procedure used in most pediatric surgeries, are safe and effective to use in infants and children, and carry with them very few complications and no lasting adverse effects. The study was done by Dr. Santhanam Suresh and colleagues at Northwestern University in Chicago.

According to the report, the estimated complication rate for caudal blocks was 1.9 percent, with the most common complications due to incorrect needle placement. Out of all the complications that were reported, none of them led to lasting or permanent adverse effects. Serious complications were extremely rare, occurring in only four out of the 18,650 cases used in the study.

“The current study is, to the best of our knowledge, the largest study to demonstrate safety of a single regional anesthesia technique in children,” wrote Dr. Suresh.

The data came from the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network (PRAN), a centralized database which collects information on practice patterns and complications of regional anesthesia techniques in children. Dr. Suresh and his colleagues analyzed the safety outcomes in 18,650 children who underwent surgery with a caudal block between 2007 and 2012. Caudal blocks were performed in 18 different children’s hospitals between the years used in the report, and according to researchers the procedure is, “likely the most common regional anesthesia technique performed in children.”

However, the report also showed a large variation in the dosage of local anesthetic used for caudal blocks. Around one-fourth of children received a dose that could cause potential toxic effects, and more studies will need to be done in order to find the optimal level of local anesthetic that should be used.

Previous studies on caudal blocks have only come from single hospitals, which made it difficult to examine the overall risks associated with the technique. The PRAN database collects data from a wide range of hospitals, making its use for this study crucial.

“This paper shows that caudal blocks for post-operative pain control are safe in children,” said Dr. Steven L. Shafer of Stanford University and Editor-in-Chief of Anesthesia & Analgesia. “It will help to guide physicians, and parents, in selecting the anesthetic that provides the best outcome for their kids.”

To read more about the new report, click here: Nerve Block Procedure is Safe in Children, Reports Anesthesia & Analgesia.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality anesthesia needles and pain control needles for anesthesiologists, pain specialists, physicians, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of anesthesia and pain control needles, please click here: Havel’s Anesthesia and Pain Control Needles.


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Let’s Talk About Pain: 19 Percent of Americans Deal With Daily Chronic Pain

Survey outlines landscape of pain from across the country

Chronic pain affects a large part of the country

New research shows that nearly one in five Americans live with chronic pain on a daily basis.

A new survey published in the October issue of the Journal of Pain found that almost one out of five Americans struggle with “significant and debilitating” chronic pain on a daily basis. The poll, which included about 35,000 American households, delivers a scary but unsurprising message: if you’re living with pain in the U.S., you’re not alone.

“Going forward, it will be important to track changes in rates of persistent pain within the U.S., and compare these rates to other countries with different health care systems,” said Jae Kennedy, study author and professor of health policy and administration at Washington State University in Spokane.

For the survey, the authors analyzed data from a 2010 National Center for Health Statistics survey. Only those with continuous pain for three months were considered for inclusion. Researchers found that 19 percent of adults experience some form of daily chronic pain, and more than two-thirds of those said their pain was “constantly present.” Likewise, more than half said their pain was “unbearable and excruciating” at times.

While physically debilitating chronic pain is an issue in and of itself, the new survey also shed light on another issue: psychic pain.

“Being in pain is depressing,” said Kennedy. “Being in pain all the time is tiring. Being in pain all the time is anxiety-provoking. So it’s plausible that pain is triggering other kinds of more psychological distress.”

Of course, now the question remains: with so many Americans struggling with chronic pain, what is the best way to treat it?

Unfortunately, not all chronic pain can be treated the same way, due to the fact that it can come from many different sources.

“If it was just one thing causing pain, we might have one treatment that would work for most people,” said Bob Twillman, director of policy and advocacy for the American Academy of Pain Management. “But, given that we have millions of people with dozens, or perhaps even hundreds of causes for their pain, we can’t use a cookie-cutter approach to treating pain.”

To read more about the new survey on chronic pain, click here: Almost 1 in 5 Americans Plagued by Constant Pain, Survey Suggests.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality pain control needles for pain specialists, physicians, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of pain control needles, please click here: Havel’s Pain Control Needles.


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American Academy of Dermatology Issues Statement on Rising Skin Cancer Costs

AAD president responds to a recent CDC study

AAD addresses rising cost of skin cancer treatment

The American Academy of Dermatology has released a statement concerning the rising cost of skin cancer treatment.

Recently the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued a study detailing the rising costs of skin cancer treatments across the country. Now, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has responded to the study. In a statement from AAD President Brett M. Coldiron, MD, FAAD, the organization said the new study, “validates the role of screening and prevention programs as a mechanism to reduce the incidence of skin cancer and its related costs.”

While the statement does address the rising costs of new breakthrough melanoma treatments, these new treatments only make up a small part of the landscape. The reason overall treatment costs have gone up in recent years isn’t because all treatments are expensive, but rather because there’s been a dramatic increase in the total number of skin cancers nationwide, which then leads to a bigger number once everything is added together.

To read the full statement from the AAD, click here: American Academy of Dermatology Statement on the Cost of Skin Cancer


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality sutures and surgical scalpel blades for dermatologists, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of sutures and surgical scalpel blades, please click here: Havel’s Sutures and Surgical Scalpel Blades.


 

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Anesthesia Alert: Regional vs. General for Post-Op M&M

Study confirms regional anesthesia as a better option

regional anesthesia better general anesthesia for post-op

A new study points to regional anesthesia as a better option over general anesthesia for post-op morbidity and mortality.

According to a new study, patients going in for elective surgery might be better off if they receive regional anesthesia over general anesthesia. These findings were made by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and presented at the most recent annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).

Researchers found that 0.81 percent of adults receiving regional anesthesia died within 30 days of surgery, compared to 1.13 percent of adults receiving general anesthesia. A small difference, perhaps, but over time with a large numbers of patients, it can certainly add up.

“The take-home message is if regional anesthesia in an option, we should consider it,” said Dr. Nahel Saied, MB BCh and lead author of the study.

Dr. Saied and his colleagues analyzed data from the American College of Surgeons’ National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2011, and looked at the records of 682,362 elective surgical procedures. These records included procedures like hernia repairs, cystoscopies and hip and knee replacements. From this, they determined the odds of 30-day mortality were 46 percent lower in patients given regional anesthesia than in those who received general anesthesia. They also found the odds of major postoperative complications were 40 percent lower in patients given regional anesthesia.

For more information on the new study, click here: Regional Better Than General Anesthesia in Study of Post-Op M&M.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality anesthesia needles and pain control needles for anesthesiologists, doctors, hospitals and other medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of anesthesia and pain control needles, please click here: Havel’s Anesthesia and Pain Control Needles.


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Money, It’s a Gas: The High Cost of Being a Veterinarian

Rising student loan debt could be plaguing the profession

Veterinarian student loan debt is at an all-time high

Many young veterinarian school graduates are facing an increasing amount of student loan debt.

This year, nearly 4,000 college students completed their veterinary education and started their journey into the profession, which is up from 2,500 in 2010. While this is certainly good news for the veterinary field, a panel at the most recent American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) annual convention titled “Veterinary Oversupply: Issues and Ethics” looked at a number of harsh realities facing the profession, namely, the high cost of student loan debt.

Veterinary students emerging from college can expect upwards of around $150,000 in debt, while only earning a median income of roughly $65,000 in their first year of work. This puts their debt-to-income ratio at 2.4, and when compared to other professions like physicians (1), dentists (1.7) and attorneys (1.7), the problem looks a little clearer, and a lot scarier.

This trend is nothing new. In fact, the last 15 years have shown a disproportionate increase in veterinary student loan compared to an increase in salary. Many veterinary school graduates think pursuing an internship and/or residency program will help in the long run, with the hope of better pay to compensate for the amount of debt accumulated over the years. However, data suggests accumulating interest over a period of time with minimal income doesn’t necessarily help, financially speaking.

So what’s needed to solve the problem? There are a lot of theories, which range from freezing tuition rates to reducing the time it takes to receive a veterinary degree. Above all else, educating the next generation of veterinary students about the realities of student loan debt could help from letting the issue go from bad … to much worse.

To read more about this issue, click here: The Rising Cost of Becoming a Veterinarian.


For over 30 years, Havel’s has offered premium quality veterinary sutures, suture needles and surgical scalpel blades for veterinarians, doctors and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of sutures, suture needles and surgical scalpel blades, please click here: Havel’s Veterinary Sutures, Suture Needles and Surgical Scalpel Blades.


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Peripheral Nerve Blocks: What Can They Do For You?

An overview of the regional anesthetic procedure

Peripheral nerve block is a type of regional anesthesia

Anesthesiologists use peripheral nerve blocks to numb a specific part of the body for surgery, with only a few, if any, side effects or complications.

Just what exactly is a peripheral nerve block? This regional anesthetic procedure is gaining new ground in modern healthcare for a variety of different reasons.

In short, peripheral nerve blocks are a type of regional anesthesia where a specific part of the body is targeted to be numbed with a local anesthetic, which then allows the area to be operated on during surgery. This is done by injecting the local anesthetic around a nerve or group of nerves that control feeling and movement to the area of the body being operated on. This technique can be used either as the sole method of anesthesia or in combination with general anesthesia.

Depending on the location of the surgery, different types of peripheral nerve blocks can be performed in order to provide the most relief for the patient. They include blocks of the upper limb (arm, forearm and hand), blocks of the lower limb (leg, knee and foot) and various blocks at the trunk (chest and abdomen). No matter what kind is used, all peripheral nerve blocks are performed by trained anesthesiologists. Ultrasound is most often used in order to identify the specific nerve or nerves that will be numbed, along with a special needle to administer the drug.

Peripheral nerve blocks provide tremendous pain relief both during and after surgery, and carry with them few side effects or complications. They’re known to reduce the use of opioids for post-surgical pain and also enable earlier physical activity.

For more information on peripheral nerve blocks, please read the following article: I See the Knife Cutting into Me … but I Feel No Pain.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality anesthesia needles and pain control needles for anesthesiologists, pain specialists, doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To learn more about Havel’s selection of anesthesia and pain control needles, please click here: Havel’s Anesthesia and Pain Control Needles.


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Neck Pain? Try More Than One Option, Together

“Combination therapy” could be the best answer for long-term relief

best treatment for neck pain is combination therapy

The secret to long-term relief for neck pain could be found in “combination therapy,” according to new research from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

A study based on 169 men and women with common neck pain recommends not one but two different forms of treatment used together as the best option for overall relief, according to a group of pain specialists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Researchers found that a combination of spinal steroid injections and conservative treatment with physical therapy and painkillers could provide the best relief for neck pain over a long period of time. Both steroid injections and conservative treatment work equally well as stand-alone treatments in the short run, but for the best long-term results, a combination of injections, physical therapy and painkillers worked surprisingly well together.

It is unknown why the combination therapy performed better over stand-alone options, and additional studies are needed to determine the exact reason for success. One possibility is that the steroid injections and pain drugs leveraged the effects of each other, while another possibility could be that all the components working together actually complemented one another.

To learn more about the new study, click here: Study Finds Best Way to Treat Neck Pain.


Since 1981, Havel’s has offered premium quality procedure needles for anesthesia and pain control for doctors, hospitals and other leading medical professionals. To see Havel’s selection of anesthesia and pain control needles, please click here: Havel’s Anesthesia and Pain Control Needles.


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